Jim Ellis

Jim & Carol Ellis 

Cadet Brigade Commander, Star Man, Lacrosse, Responsible for the recording of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur‘s Duty Honor Country Farewell Address to the Cadet Corps – on 12 May 1962.  Commanded 3d Army, “Patton’s Own”  The team is more important than any individual. While individuals may perform outstandingly (we have awards); it is the success of the team that determines the outcome of the battle and the war. As General Patton said, “The Army moves as a team, eats as a team, and fights as a team.”

  1.  Farrell UtterbackPosted November 1, 2017 at 10:06 am I served under, then capt. Ellis in 67. He was my Co.
    in a inf. co. with the first inf.
    I had the pleasure of taking him and his wife Carol
    to dinner in 2006.
    I had the upmost respect for him as a officer and a
    gentelmen.Utterback (Bud)


1962

1st Captain

Star Man

Lacrosse

Jim – – Just as Cadets we gave, We have served our Nation as Graduates.

Jim Ellis took it upon himself (taking it from meeting to meeting, from post to post) to have the Pictorial of General of The Army Douglas MacArthur speaking to us just prior to our graduation, signed by the members of the Class of 1962. Jim asked Harry Hagerty to sign for Turk Griffith who we lost in Vietnam. The Pictorial hangs on the South wall of the 62 Room

There were 4 Cadets specifically included in the Pictorial – Jim Kays (who was not there – he was on weekend with Jeane now his wife), Jim Ellis, — —

The recording of General of the Army Douglas MacArthur‘s Duty Honor Country – on 12 May 1962, was accomplished only because Jim Ellis Class of 1962, Cadet Brigade Commander did not feel it was satisfactory to have only a written record.

http://forwhattheygaveonsaturdayafternoon.com/wp-1962/macarthur-dhc

The Worth of a Class by Dave Phillips is at – –

http://usma1962.westpointaog.com/WorthofaWPClass.htm

Lieutenant General James R. Ellis

General Ellis was born in Birmingham, Alabama, on 29 January 1937. He enlisted in the Army in 1955, entered the United States Military Academy in July 1958, graduated from USMA in June 1962, and was commissioned in the Infantry.

Education

General Ellis has a Bachelor of Science Degree from West Point and a Masters Degree in Public and International Affairs from Princeton University. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic Course, the Army Officer Advanced Course, the Armed Forces Staff College, and the National War College.

Assignments
General Ellis’ past assignments include Company Commander in the 82d Airborne Division at Fort Bragg and in the Dominican Republic; Company Commander and Assistant G3 in the 1st Infantry Division in Vietnam; Advisor in the Delta Region of Vietnam; Assistant Professor of Economics and International Relations at West Point; Infantry Battalion Executive Officer and Deputy Chief of Staff of the 7th Infantry Division at Fort Ord; Commander of a Basic combat Training Battalion at Fort Leonard Wood; Staff Officer in the Office of the Army Chief of Staff and in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs; Commander of the 29th Infantry Regiment at Fort Benning; Chief of Staff and Garrison Commander of Fort Benning; Assistant Division Commander of the 10th Mountain Division; Chief, Office of the Defense Representative to Pakistan; Commanding General, 10th Mountain Division and Fort Drum; Deputy Commander in Chief and Chief of Staff, United States Central Command. His last assignment was Commanding General, Third Army, July 18, 1992 to July 15, 1994

Overseas Tours

He served two tours in Vietnam, one in the Dominican Republic with the 82d, and one in Pakistan. General Ellis has had five joint assignments.

Awards & Decorations

General Ellis’ awards and decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Defense Superior Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Combat Infantryman Badge, Ranger Tab, Master Parachutist’s Badge, Department of the Army General Staff Identification Badge, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Identification Badge.

Association of Graduates, U.S.M.A. Register of Graduates and Former Cadets. Cullum no. 23829.

 Commanded 3d Army, “Patton’s Own”  The team is more important than any individual. While individuals may perform outstandingly (we have awards); it is the success of the team that determines the outcome of the battle and the war. As General Patton said, “The Army moves as a team, eats as a team, and fights as a team.”

Publications

Ellis, James R., Captain. “Hot Pursuit.” Cavalry Journal. 77:Sept.-Oct., 1968, 9-11.

Our Army is a team. As General Patton said, “The Army moves as a team, eats as a team, and fights as a team.” The team is more important than any individual. While individuals may perform outstandingly (and we have an awards and promotion system to recognize outstanding performance); it is the success of the team that determines the outcome of the battle and the war. We train cadets at West Point to be outstanding individuals and to work together to accomplish team goals. But mostly we train them to be leaders of teams – Platoon through Theater Army. Patton understood the importance of teams and their accomplishments. I think General Patton would support the efforts on behalf of the ’53 Football Team.

Jim went on to say —

In my last three years on active duty, I was twice President of the
promotion board selecting LTC to COL. This was a very tough selection
because it was the first time that less than half of those eligible
would be selected. The selection rate from Captain to Major was about
75 to 80 % and the rate from Major to LTC was close to 65 %. But the
rate from LTC to Colonel was 40 % or less.

It was made even tougher by the fact that all the candidates were dedicated officers who had put 18 to 21 years into their careers with the attendant disruptions, relocations and dangers associated with our chosen profession.

The Army treated this selection process with extreme care. The promotion board was made up of 20 General Officers from all over the Army, and it met for six weeks. The board make-up was carefully chosen – every major command and line branch was represented (Chaplain, Medical and JAG had their own boards). Also, there were female and minority members.

Fairness and impartiality had to be practiced and outwardly perceived. The guidance was very clear and in two distinct but supporting parts:

Select the best qualified who meet the needs of the Army. Read that carefully. We couldn’t select just combat arms officers; there were needs in all branches. And, an Army with large numbers of minority and female troops had a need for upward mobility of minority and female officers.

The Army Athletic Hall of Fame selection committee is facing a similar task. They must select the best qualified who meet the needs of the graduates and current (and future) cadets – all of them. Each sport must be considered – team and individual, male and female. And, they must look at “old timers” as well as more recent candidates. I’m sure the selection committee members are all working under tough pressures.

PURPOSE

The purpose of the Army Sports Hall of Fame, located within the Kenna Hall of Army Sports, is to honor the athletes, coaches, teams, administrators and others who have brought distinction to Army athletics over its many years of existence. Those team and individual achievements deemed worthy of admittance, based on the established criteria, will be formally recognized with displays in a designated Hall of Fame area of the Kenna Hall of Army Sports, located within the Kimsey Athletic Center.

 

2 Comments

  1. Marc Anthony
    Posted March 2, 2016 at 3:44 am | Permalink

    I had the honor to me this General and his wife Carol. Wow what a honor.

    Marc Anthony from Century Kia

  2. Farrell Utterback
    Posted November 1, 2017 at 10:06 am | Permalink

    I served under, then capt. Ellis in 67. He was my Co.
    in a inf. co. with the first inf.
    I had the pleasure of taking him and his wife Carol
    to dinner in 2006.
    I had the upmost respect for him as a officer and a
    gentelmen.

    Utterback (Bud)

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