Category Archives: Uncategorized

Robert Hufschmid

Bob Hufschmid

Robert Hufschmid & Suzy Weisman

William Hoos

William Arthur Hoos

WILLIAM ARTHUR HOOS JR

 
CAPT – O3 – Army – Regular 
25th Infantry Division 

Length of service 4 years
His tour began on Jan 5, 1966
Casualty was on Feb 14, 1966
In , SOUTH VIETNAM
HOSTILE, GROUND CASUALTY
MULTIPLE FRAGMENTATION WOUNDS
Body was recovered
DATE OF BIRTH: May 2, 1937
PLACE OF BIRTH:
Indiana
HOME OF RECORD:
East Chicago, Indiana

William Hoos graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1962.

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: 1 of 1


Silver Star

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Vietnam War
Service: Army
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Division: 25th Infantry Division
GENERAL ORDERS:
CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) William Arthur Hoos, Jr. (ASN: 0-95978), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company A , 1st Battalion, 5th Mechanized Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, during a reconnaissance in force operation near Cu Chi, Republic of Vietnam on 14 February 1966. During the early morning hours Captain Hoos’ company made contact with and engaged a well-fortified Viet Cong force employing small arms and automatic weapons. With complete disregard for his own safety Captain Hoos continuously exposed himself to the intense hostile fire while leading his men through the heavily booby trapped area. He personally directed the fires of his men, administered to their needs, maintained an air of calmness and strong leadership, and assisted in protecting the landing site he had selected for the evacuation of casualties. He constantly cautioned his men about booby traps and personally pointed them out to his men that day. While directing fire against a hostile emplacement, a command detonated mine was exploded directly to the front of Captain Hoos which mortally wounded him. Inspired by his dauntless and heroic actions of that day, Captain Hoos’ men successfully completed the mission. Captain Hoos’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

POSTED ON 9.25.2001 POSTED BY: PATRICK LUZZI WILLISM ARTHUR HOOS You have a beautiful grandaughter named Malia borne by your daughter Terri.

OSTED ON 5.2.2020

POSTED BY: KR

CPT WILLIAM A. HOOS JR. – BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE (83D)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Rocky’s fellow alumni from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point – a Plebe in Cadet Company G-1, USCC when Rocky was a Firstie in Co. K-2, and a brother Airborne-Ranger – Captain William Arthur Hoos Jr., USMA Class of 1962, on what would’ve been his 83d birthday – 2 May 2020.

POSTED ON 7.11.2019

POSTED BY: LUCY MICIK

THANK YOU

Dear Captain William Hoos, Thank you for your service as an Infantry Unit Commander. Thanks also for graduating from WEST POINT. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.

POSTED ON 5.2.2019

POSTED BY: DENNIS WRISTON

I’M PROUD OF OUR VIETNAM VETERANS

Captain William Arthur Hoos Jr., Served with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, United States Army Vietnam.

POSTED ON 3.12.2016

POSTED BY: KR

CPT WILLIAM A. HOOS JR. – USMA GRADUATE

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CPT William Arthur Hoos Jr was an alumnus of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY. He was one of 335 men from West Point who died or are MIA in Southeast Asia/Indochina during the period October, 1957 – September, 1972. “Well done; Be thou at peace.” 

POSTED ON 12.22.2013

POSTED BY: RUSS DOWDEN

NEVER FORGOTTEN!

Bill Hoos was an infantry company commander with A Company, 1st Battalion 5th Mechanized Infantry, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, when he was killed in action on 14 February 1966, near Cu Chi, Vietnam. I was with Captain Hoos that day, working as his artillery forward observer.

POSTED ON 12.18.2013

POSTED BY: CURT CARTER CCARTER02@EARTHLINK.NET

REMEMBERING AN AMERICAN HERO

Dear Captain William Arthur Hoos Jr, sir 

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned. 

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you. 

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir 

Curt Carter

IF I SHOULD DIE…REMEMBRANCES FOR CAPT. WILLIAM ARTHUR HOOS, JR, USA…WHO DIED FOR OUR COUNTRY!!!!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep…for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile…Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine…Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine…and I, perchnace, may therein comfort you.

CAPTAIN 

WILLIAM ARTHUR HOOS JR

WAS A DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE 

OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY

AT WEST POINT, NEW YORK 

IN THE CLASS OF 1962 

WHO MET HIS UNTIMELY DEATH 

ON 14 FEBRUARY 1966 

WHILE SERVING WITH

ALPHA COMPANY

2nd BRIGADE (MECHANIZED)

5th INFANTRY REGIMENT

” BOBCATS “

25th INFANTRY DIVISION

” TROPIC LIGHTNING ” 

HE WAS POSTHUMOUSLY AWARDED 

THE PURPLE HEART MEDAL

NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL

VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL

REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM CAMPAIGN SERVICE MEDAL

and was entitled to wear the

COMBAT INFANTRYMAN BADGE

~~~ – DUTY – HONOR – COUNTRY – ~~~

~~~ – THE LONG GRAY LINE – ~~~

YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN

NOR SHALL YOU EVER BE

USMA – 1962 – 24026

POSTED ON 2.14.2004

POSTED BY: ROBERTA (PFC JOSEPH DANIEL JARRELL’S SISTER)

THANK YOU

Thank you William for serving our country and for our freedom. My brother was KIA on the same day as you, that day our thoughts was with him, but now, my thoughts are with each and every one of you who have made any sacrifice and served. May God bless each of you!!

Jim McDonough

8/2/1966 James & Lucy McDonough

James M. McDonough


VIEW ALL PHOTOS (2)

HONORED ON PANEL 9E, LINE 99 OF THE WALL

DATE OF BIRTH: 29-Nov-39
HOME OF RECORD:
Portland, Maine

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: 1 of 1


Silver Star

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Vietnam War
Service: Army
Rank: Captain
Battalion: 2d Battalion
Division: 25th Infantry Division
GENERAL ORDERS:

Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 6041 (October 15, 1966)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) James M. McDonough, Jr. (ASN: 0-96057), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain McDonough distinguished himself on 2 August 1966, while serving as a Platoon Leader during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving toward its objective, Captain McDonough’s company uncovered a Viet Cong base camp and immediately received intense hostile fire. Captain McDonough, quickly realizing that the numerically superior Viet Cong force was maneuvering to encircle his unit, repositioned his men. At this time, the insurgents began to mortar attack the besieged American unit. Realizing that his troops could not successfully break contact at this time, Captain McDonough directed the retaliatory fire of his men. Seeing his radio operator lying wounded in an exposed position, Captain McDonough, with complete disregard for his safety, crawled through intense hostile fire and dragged his wounded comrade to a covered position. After administering first aid, he called in an accurate artillery barrage upon the assaulting insurgents which repulsed them. During the lull that followed, Captain McDonough moved among his men giving instructions, attending the wounded, and reorganizing the defense. When a second Viet Cong assault began under the cover of mortar fire, Captain McDonough again called for and adjusted artillery fire. He then repeatedly braved the hostile fire while moving among his men, directing their fire and repositioning them until he was mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. Through his courageous efforts, Captain McDonough contributed immeasurably in repelling the Viet Cong force until a friendly relief force arrived. His extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Captain James M McDonough was awarded the Silver Star Medal for his exemplary courage under fire. The citation reads (in part): “Captain McDonough distinguished himself on 2 August 1966, while serving as a Platoon Leader during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving toward its objective, Captain McDonough’s company uncovered a Viet Cong base camp and immediately received intense hostile fire. Captain McDonough, quickly realizing that the numerically superior Viet Cong force was maneuvering to encircle his unit, repositioned his men. At this time, the insurgents began to mortar attack the besieged American unit. Realizing that his troops could not successfully break contact at this time, Captain McDonough directed the retaliatory fire of his men. Seeing his radio operator lying wounded in an exposed position, Captain McDonough, with complete disregard for his safety, crawled through intense hostile fire and dragged his wounded comrade to a covered position.” 
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/24533 

CPT JAMES M. MCDONOUGH, USMA 1962 – BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE (81ST)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Rocky’s fellow alumni from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point – a Plebe in Cadet Company B-1, USCC when Rocky was a Firstie in Co. K-2 and a brother Airborne-Ranger/CIB recipient – Captain James Michael McDonough Jr., USMA class of 1962, on what would’ve been his 81st birthday – 29 November 2020.

THANK YOU

Dear Captain James McDonough, Thank you for your service as an Infantry Unit Commander and for graduating from West Point. Your 54th anniversary just passed, sad. Saying thank you isn’t enough, but it is from the heart. Time passes quickly, but our world needs help. Please watch over America, it stills needs your strength, courage, guidance and faithfulness. Rest in peace with the angels.

REMEMBERING AN AMERICAN HERO

Dear Captain James M McDonough Jr, sir 

As an American, I would like to thank you for your service and for your sacrifice made on behalf of our wonderful country. The youth of today could gain much by learning of heroes such as yourself, men and women whose courage and heart can never be questioned. 

May God allow you to read this, and may He allow me to someday shake your hand when I get to Heaven to personally thank you. May he also allow my father to find you and shake your hand now to say thank you; for America, and for those who love you. 

With respect, and the best salute a civilian can muster for you, Sir 

Curt Carter 

WE REMEMBER

James is buried at New Calvary Cemetery in South Portland, ME. SS BSM AM-3OLC PH

IF I SHOULD DIE…REMEMBRANCES FOR CAPT. JAMES M.MCDONOUGH, JR. USA…WHO DIED FOR OUR COUNTRY!!!!!!

If I should die, and leave you here awhile, be not like others, sore undone, who keep long vigils by the silent dust, and weep…for MY sake, turn again to life, and smile…Nerving thy heart, and trembling hand to do something to comfort other hearts than thine…Complete these dear, unfinished tasks of mine…and I, perchnace, may therein comfort you.

POSTED ON 12.19.2001

POSTED BY: BEN YOUMANS

CACTI FOREVER

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A Company, 2/35th Infantry, 3rd Brigade, 25th Inf Division.
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; 
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me 
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, 
This day shall gentle his condition; 
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed 
Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here, 
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks 
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.
http://www.cacti35th.org

POSTED ON 11.15.1998

POSTED BY: MIKE MCDONNELL

A POEM FOR JIM

Gathered under ponchos in the rain
Our world submerged by monsoon weather 
Steaming heat and tough terrain
Guided by the Master’s hand

It was a time unlike another
Never to be shared again
But you will always be my brother
And in my memory of a distant land


Al Wilhelm

Douglas Wauchope

This is his photo from 3/3 Marines while on ship to Chu Lai, Vietnam in early 1965.

United States Marine Corps First Lieutenant. He was killed from small arms fire in Vietnam. 

Lt. Wauchope, who was taking part in Operation Starlite, was the first Marine officer killed during the Vietnam War.

DOUGLAS, AN OLDER BROTHER

Douglas was one of “our” cadets when my dad, a Marine officer and Annapolis graduate, taught at West Point from 1958-1961. Douglas came to our quarters most every weekend from his plebe year until we were transferred. He became and older brother to my brothers and sisters and I. I will never forget when my dad came home from work when we lived in D.C. and told us that Douglas had been killed. We will never forget him, he was loved by us all. His photo hangs on my wall. Semper Fi Douglas and my Dad, Col. Mac Richards, CO 9th Marines 66-67 and CO 2nd Marines 62-63. 

BRONZE STAR MEDAL AWARD FOR VALOR

Lt. Douglas Wauchope was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, with Combat Distinguishing Device (V), for his exemplary gallantry in action. He served as an Infantry Officer and was assigned to L CO, 3RD BN, 3RD MARINES, 3RD MARDIV. 
See https://marines.togetherweserved.com/

1STLT DOUGLAS J. WAUCHOPE – BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE (84TH)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Rocky’s fellow alumni from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point – a Plebe in Cadet Company D-2, USCC when Rocky was a Firstie in Co. K-2 – 1st Lt Douglas Joyce Wauchope, USMA Class of 1962, USMC, on what would’ve been his 84th birthday – 18 August 2020.

THANK YOU DOUG
POSTED ON 5.7.2020 BY: ALFRED D. WILHELM JR.

Thank you Doug. You were a great roommate, older brother and example to a very, young and inexperienced cadet. You continue to be missed and often remembered for your help and encouragement. Al Wilhelm

Leslie Groves

One of the things I remember from his comments, was the incident where someone told General Groves that Heavy Water could only be found in a specific location. General Groves knew – “Heavy water can be made using hydrogen sulfide-water chemical exchange, water distillation, or electrolysis. Hydrogen Sulfide-Water Exchange – In a mixture of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and water at chemical equilibrium, the concentration of deuterium in water is greater than the concentration in H2S”

In September 1942, Groves was appointed to head the Manhattan Project with the rank of Temporary Brigadier General. As project leader, he was in charge of all of the project’s phases, including scientific, technical and process development; construction; production; security and military intelligence of enemy activities; and planning for use of the bomb.

Under General Groves’ direction, atomic research was conducted at Columbia University and the University of Chicago. The main project sites were built at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. He personally selected J. Robert Oppenheimer as leader of the Los Alamos laboratory, disregarding the latter man’s Communist associations and waiving his security clearance process.

Groves was known for his critical and stubborn attitude, egotism, intelligence, and drive to achieve his goals at all costs. He continued to lead the project until 1947, when atomic energy affairs were turned over to the newly created civilian Atomic Energy Commission.

Colonel Kenneth D. Nichols, district engineer of the Manhattan Engineer District, wrote of Groves: “First, General Groves is the biggest S.O.B. I have ever worked for. He is most demanding. He is most critical. He is always a driver, never a praiser. He is abrasive and sarcastic. He disregards all normal organizational channels. He is extremely intelligent. He has the guts to make timely, difficult decisions. He is the most egotistical man I know. He knows he is right and so sticks by his decision. He abounds with energy and expects everyone to work as hard, or even harder, than he does… if I had to do my part of the atomic bomb project over again and had the privilege of picking my boss, I would pick General Groves.”

Leslie Groves was born in Albany, New York, on August 17, 1896. He attended the University of Washington for one year and then Massachusetts Institute of Technology for two years before entering West Point, from which he graduated in 1918. He was commissioned in the Engineers and took courses at the Engineer’s School, Camp Humphreys (now Fort Belvoir), Virginia, 1918-20 and 1921, with time out for brief service in France during World War I. 

In 1931, Groves was attached to the Office of the Chief of Engineers in Washington and was promoted to Captain in October 1934. In 1936, he graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and from the Army War College in 1939, after which he was assigned to the General Staff in Washington. He was promoted to Major and Temporary Colonel in July and November 1940 and assigned first to the Office of the Quartermaster General and then to the Office of the Chief of Engineers.

As deputy to the Chief of Construction in 1940 his projects included the building of camps, depots, air bases, munitions plants, hospitals, airplane plants, and the massive Pentagon, which he completed building in less than a year and a half. Groves oversaw a million men and spent $8 billion on Army construction with a peak month in July 1942 of $720 million, the equivalent of fifteen Pentagons. Groves’ proven record of managing complex undertakings made him a logical choice to lead the Manhattan Project.

In September 1942, Groves was placed in charge of the Manhattan Engineer Project, with the rank of Temporary Brigadier General, and under his direction, the basic atomic bomb research was carried out, mainly at Columbia University and the University of Chicago. He was in charge of all phases of the project – scientific, production, security and planning for use of the bomb. Under his direction, project plants were established at Oak Ridge, Hanford and the secluded Los Alamos installation in New Mexico.

Groves was promoted to temporary Major General in 1944, and he continued to head the atomic establishment created during wartime until January 1947. He was then named the Chief of the Army’s Special Weapons Project. Promoted to Lieutenant General (temporary) in January 1948, he retired a month later. From that time until 1961, he worked as Vice President of Sperry Rand Corporation. He also served as president of the West Point alumni association.

Groves died of heart disease on July 13, 1970, and was buried in Section 2 of Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, Grace Hulbert Wilson Groves, whom he married on February 10, 1922, is buried with him.

Chuck Dominy

Chuck & Mary Dominy

During his years of military service, Lt. Gen. Dominy served as Director of Army Staff. He acted on behalf of the Chief of Staff and coordinated the activities of all agencies reporting to the Chief of Staff. He served as Chief of Legislative Liaison for all Army activities related to the U.S. Congress, was Commanding General of the U.S. Army Missouri Engineer Division, Executive to the Secretary of the Army, and the District Engineer of the U.S. Army Savannah Engineer District.

Lt. Gen. Dominy’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Bronze Star (with Oak Leaf Cluster), three Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal (with Four Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, and the Army Staff Identification Badge.

Lt. Gen. Dominy earned an M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Illinois; B.S. United States Military Academy; Advanced Executive Management, Emory University; U.S. Army War College; Command & General Staff College; and Engineer Officer Basic & Advanced Courses.

 

During his years of military service, Lt. Gen. Dominy served as Director of Army Staff. He acted on behalf of the Chief of Staff and coordinated the activities of all agencies reporting to the Chief of Staff. He served as Chief of Legislative Liaison for all Army activities related to the U.S. Congress, was Commanding General of the U.S. Army Missouri Engineer Division, Executive to the Secretary of the Army, and the District Engineer of the U.S. Army Savannah Engineer District.

Lt. Gen. Dominy’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Bronze Star (with Oak Leaf Cluster), three Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal (with Four Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, and the Army Staff Identification Badge.

Lt. Gen. Dominy earned an M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Illinois; B.S. United States Military Academy; Advanced Executive Management, Emory University; U.S. Army War College; Command & General Staff College; and Engineer Officer Basic & Advanced Courses.

Bill Daugherty

John Dargle

Mike Currin

Grindley Curren

Bob Coyne

Tom Culp

Art Crowell

Ruf Crow

Bob Coyne

Bob & Patricia Coye

Jim Cowles

Jim Corr

Walt Copper

Fred Comer