Author Archives: forwhattheygave

Jim McDonough

8/2/1966 James & Lucy McDonough

James M. McDonough

DATE OF BIRTH: 29-Nov-39
HOME OF RECORD:
Portland, Maine

AWARDS BY DATE OF ACTION: 1 of 1


Silver Star

AWARDED FOR ACTIONS
DURING Vietnam War
Service: Army
Rank: Captain
Battalion: 2d Battalion
Division: 25th Infantry Division
GENERAL ORDERS:

Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 6041 (October 15, 1966)

CITATION:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) James M. McDonough, Jr. (ASN: 0-96057), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain McDonough distinguished himself on 2 August 1966, while serving as a Platoon Leader during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving toward its objective, Captain McDonough’s company uncovered a Viet Cong base camp and immediately received intense hostile fire. Captain McDonough, quickly realizing that the numerically superior Viet Cong force was maneuvering to encircle his unit, repositioned his men. At this time, the insurgents began to mortar attack the besieged American unit. Realizing that his troops could not successfully break contact at this time, Captain McDonough directed the retaliatory fire of his men. Seeing his radio operator lying wounded in an exposed position, Captain McDonough, with complete disregard for his safety, crawled through intense hostile fire and dragged his wounded comrade to a covered position. After administering first aid, he called in an accurate artillery barrage upon the assaulting insurgents which repulsed them. During the lull that followed, Captain McDonough moved among his men giving instructions, attending the wounded, and reorganizing the defense. When a second Viet Cong assault began under the cover of mortar fire, Captain McDonough again called for and adjusted artillery fire. He then repeatedly braved the hostile fire while moving among his men, directing their fire and repositioning them until he was mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. Through his courageous efforts, Captain McDonough contributed immeasurably in repelling the Viet Cong force until a friendly relief force arrived. His extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Captain James M McDonough was awarded the Silver Star Medal for his exemplary courage under fire. The citation reads (in part): “Captain McDonough distinguished himself on 2 August 1966, while serving as a Platoon Leader during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving toward its objective, Captain McDonough’s company uncovered a Viet Cong base camp and immediately received intense hostile fire. Captain McDonough, quickly realizing that the numerically superior Viet Cong force was maneuvering to encircle his unit, repositioned his men. At this time, the insurgents began to mortar attack the besieged American unit. Realizing that his troops could not successfully break contact at this time, Captain McDonough directed the retaliatory fire of his men. Seeing his radio operator lying wounded in an exposed position, Captain McDonough, with complete disregard for his safety, crawled through intense hostile fire and dragged his wounded comrade to a covered position.” 
See https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/24533 

Al Wilhelm

Douglas Wauchope

This is his photo from 3/3 Marines while on ship to Chu Lai, Vietnam in early 1965.

United States Marine Corps First Lieutenant. He was killed from small arms fire in Vietnam. 

Lt. Wauchope, who was taking part in Operation Starlite, was the first Marine officer killed during the Vietnam War.

DOUGLAS, AN OLDER BROTHER

Douglas was one of “our” cadets when my dad, a Marine officer and Annapolis graduate, taught at West Point from 1958-1961. Douglas came to our quarters most every weekend from his plebe year until we were transferred. He became and older brother to my brothers and sisters and I. I will never forget when my dad came home from work when we lived in D.C. and told us that Douglas had been killed. We will never forget him, he was loved by us all. His photo hangs on my wall. Semper Fi Douglas and my Dad, Col. Mac Richards, CO 9th Marines 66-67 and CO 2nd Marines 62-63. 

BRONZE STAR MEDAL AWARD FOR VALOR

Lt. Douglas Wauchope was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Valor, with Combat Distinguishing Device (V), for his exemplary gallantry in action. He served as an Infantry Officer and was assigned to L CO, 3RD BN, 3RD MARINES, 3RD MARDIV. 
See https://marines.togetherweserved.com/

1STLT DOUGLAS J. WAUCHOPE – BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCE (84TH)

The “Friends of Rocky Versace” remember one of Rocky’s fellow alumni from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point – a Plebe in Cadet Company D-2, USCC when Rocky was a Firstie in Co. K-2 – 1st Lt Douglas Joyce Wauchope, USMA Class of 1962, USMC, on what would’ve been his 84th birthday – 18 August 2020.

THANK YOU DOUG
POSTED ON 5.7.2020 BY: ALFRED D. WILHELM JR.

Thank you Doug. You were a great roommate, older brother and example to a very, young and inexperienced cadet. You continue to be missed and often remembered for your help and encouragement. Al Wilhelm

Leslie Groves

One of the things I remember from his comments, was the incident where someone told General Groves that Heavy Water could only be found in a specific location. General Groves knew – “Heavy water can be made using hydrogen sulfide-water chemical exchange, water distillation, or electrolysis. Hydrogen Sulfide-Water Exchange – In a mixture of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and water at chemical equilibrium, the concentration of deuterium in water is greater than the concentration in H2S”

In September 1942, Groves was appointed to head the Manhattan Project with the rank of Temporary Brigadier General. As project leader, he was in charge of all of the project’s phases, including scientific, technical and process development; construction; production; security and military intelligence of enemy activities; and planning for use of the bomb.

Under General Groves’ direction, atomic research was conducted at Columbia University and the University of Chicago. The main project sites were built at Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Hanford. He personally selected J. Robert Oppenheimer as leader of the Los Alamos laboratory, disregarding the latter man’s Communist associations and waiving his security clearance process.

Groves was known for his critical and stubborn attitude, egotism, intelligence, and drive to achieve his goals at all costs. He continued to lead the project until 1947, when atomic energy affairs were turned over to the newly created civilian Atomic Energy Commission.

Colonel Kenneth D. Nichols, district engineer of the Manhattan Engineer District, wrote of Groves: “First, General Groves is the biggest S.O.B. I have ever worked for. He is most demanding. He is most critical. He is always a driver, never a praiser. He is abrasive and sarcastic. He disregards all normal organizational channels. He is extremely intelligent. He has the guts to make timely, difficult decisions. He is the most egotistical man I know. He knows he is right and so sticks by his decision. He abounds with energy and expects everyone to work as hard, or even harder, than he does… if I had to do my part of the atomic bomb project over again and had the privilege of picking my boss, I would pick General Groves.”

Leslie Groves was born in Albany, New York, on August 17, 1896. He attended the University of Washington for one year and then Massachusetts Institute of Technology for two years before entering West Point, from which he graduated in 1918. He was commissioned in the Engineers and took courses at the Engineer’s School, Camp Humphreys (now Fort Belvoir), Virginia, 1918-20 and 1921, with time out for brief service in France during World War I. 

In 1931, Groves was attached to the Office of the Chief of Engineers in Washington and was promoted to Captain in October 1934. In 1936, he graduated from the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and from the Army War College in 1939, after which he was assigned to the General Staff in Washington. He was promoted to Major and Temporary Colonel in July and November 1940 and assigned first to the Office of the Quartermaster General and then to the Office of the Chief of Engineers.

As deputy to the Chief of Construction in 1940 his projects included the building of camps, depots, air bases, munitions plants, hospitals, airplane plants, and the massive Pentagon, which he completed building in less than a year and a half. Groves oversaw a million men and spent $8 billion on Army construction with a peak month in July 1942 of $720 million, the equivalent of fifteen Pentagons. Groves’ proven record of managing complex undertakings made him a logical choice to lead the Manhattan Project.

In September 1942, Groves was placed in charge of the Manhattan Engineer Project, with the rank of Temporary Brigadier General, and under his direction, the basic atomic bomb research was carried out, mainly at Columbia University and the University of Chicago. He was in charge of all phases of the project – scientific, production, security and planning for use of the bomb. Under his direction, project plants were established at Oak Ridge, Hanford and the secluded Los Alamos installation in New Mexico.

Groves was promoted to temporary Major General in 1944, and he continued to head the atomic establishment created during wartime until January 1947. He was then named the Chief of the Army’s Special Weapons Project. Promoted to Lieutenant General (temporary) in January 1948, he retired a month later. From that time until 1961, he worked as Vice President of Sperry Rand Corporation. He also served as president of the West Point alumni association.

Groves died of heart disease on July 13, 1970, and was buried in Section 2 of Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, Grace Hulbert Wilson Groves, whom he married on February 10, 1922, is buried with him.

Chuck Dominy

Chuck & Mary Dominy

During his years of military service, Lt. Gen. Dominy served as Director of Army Staff. He acted on behalf of the Chief of Staff and coordinated the activities of all agencies reporting to the Chief of Staff. He served as Chief of Legislative Liaison for all Army activities related to the U.S. Congress, was Commanding General of the U.S. Army Missouri Engineer Division, Executive to the Secretary of the Army, and the District Engineer of the U.S. Army Savannah Engineer District.

Lt. Gen. Dominy’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Bronze Star (with Oak Leaf Cluster), three Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal (with Four Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, and the Army Staff Identification Badge.

Lt. Gen. Dominy earned an M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Illinois; B.S. United States Military Academy; Advanced Executive Management, Emory University; U.S. Army War College; Command & General Staff College; and Engineer Officer Basic & Advanced Courses.

 

During his years of military service, Lt. Gen. Dominy served as Director of Army Staff. He acted on behalf of the Chief of Staff and coordinated the activities of all agencies reporting to the Chief of Staff. He served as Chief of Legislative Liaison for all Army activities related to the U.S. Congress, was Commanding General of the U.S. Army Missouri Engineer Division, Executive to the Secretary of the Army, and the District Engineer of the U.S. Army Savannah Engineer District.

Lt. Gen. Dominy’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Bronze Star (with Oak Leaf Cluster), three Air Medals, the Meritorious Service Medal (with Four Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal with “V” Device (with Oak Leaf Cluster), the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger Tab, and the Army Staff Identification Badge.

Lt. Gen. Dominy earned an M.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Illinois; B.S. United States Military Academy; Advanced Executive Management, Emory University; U.S. Army War College; Command & General Staff College; and Engineer Officer Basic & Advanced Courses.

Bill Daugherty

John Dargle

Mike Currin

Grindley Curren

Bob Coyne

Tom Culp

Art Crowell

Ruf Crow

Bob Coyne

Bob & Patricia Coye

Jim Cowles

Jim Corr

Walt Copper

Fred Comer

Jerry Comello

Roy Cole

Roy Cole & Barbara Dorsey

During the summer of 1965 Roy was serving in IV Corps with MACV, and I was with the Marine’s ANGLICO at our Can Tho Headquarters. Bob Fuellhart was among our classmates in the area. Bob was with an ARVN Ranger battalion. Over evening beers Bob would often regale us with stories of his “Tiger” unit’s audacity and bravery in action. One the morning of 12 August, 1965 I was serving my round of duty in the MACV TOC. Bob’s unit was in action and we heard a radio transmission that there were wounded. It was not to long after that when we received word that Bob had been killed during that action. It was only then when an RTO quietly brought a telegram over to my desk. It was a congratulation message from Bob’s (now widow), that she had just given birth to their first child. Roy and I assisted in carrying Bob’s coffin onto an airplane.
Less than a week later I was deployed on a temporary mission and rooming with our classmate, Chuck Chandler. Another West Pointer, Ned Loscuito, Class of 1960, was also assigned to this small outpost. Ned had been a member of our Beast Barracks cadre during 1958. During a sweep of a neighboring area on 20 August, Ned was also killed. I was in a funk trying just how any of this made sense. Here we were, supposedly the best and brightest, trained in all aspects of war, and some kid with a WW II bolt action rifle should be so effective against us. Shortly after that I also found out that I could not out run a VC machine gun. I had a lot of growing to do.
The somewhat irony of life was Chuck was an Olmstead Scholar in Sao Paulo, Brazil, when his life was cut short by an assassin’s bullet. Jerry & Frances Garwick