Tag Archives: Lacrosse

John K Waters

http://apps.westpointaog.org/Memorials/Article/9175/

JohnKWaters_USMA1931

GenJohnKWaters-Obits_OFLAG64_Mar89

Mack Howard

Lacrosse

Al Girardi

3 Years Lacrosse
Waiting for Al to provide some info

1961 Lacrosse Team

Lacrosse – Can Do


Richard Steinke

Lacrosse Manager Plebe and Yearling Year

1961 Lacrosse Team

James Adams – Army Lacrosse Coach 1958 – 1969

Hall of Fame – – – http://www.uslacrosse.org/museum/halloffame/view_profile.php?prof_id=10

Coach Ace Adams being chunked into the Severn River after the 1961 Army-Navy Lacrosse game, won by Army 10-8.

This game, played in the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, was the first lacrosse game ever to be televised nationally. Ron Hannon ’61 seemed to come up with every ground ball and Dick Buckner ’61 hit a Navy defenseman so hard I felt the ground shake.

One of the best lacrosse pictures I’ve ever seen is in our 62 Howitzer of Mac Howard taking a shot in that game. Rusty Broshous scored two goals when we needed them most. Our victory enabled Army to share the National Championship with Navy- we had dropped a game to Virginia earlier.

As you can guess, we were jubilant. As soon as coach hit the water, we all jumped in after him still in uniform. “Holy Cow! (or perhaps words a little stronger) The tide’s out!” shouted Dave Harkins. We were facing a six foot high sea-wall. Fortunately, our ever-faithful bus driver Jake knew what to do. He retrieved a rope and life-saving ring from Halsey Field House and fished us out one by one. by Butch Darrell – 1962 Lacrosse Captain

Sports Illustrated — June 12, 1961

JOYS OF A JUNE WEEK —
By Ray Cave

Army and Navy, those classic rivals, celebrate graduation time with fun and games at West Point and Annapolis, and both win approval from several thousand pretty guests

Whether you were the type who loves a parade, the sort who goes where the girls are or simply a connoisseur of athletic Donnybrooks — the place to be last Saturday (June 3d) was either West Point or Annapolis.

On the stern high bluffs above the Hudson were the pomp and pageantry of an Army graduation week, hundreds of pretty young ladies who had come from every state in the union and an Army-Navy baseball game that starred a very famous athlete. And on the gentle slopes of the Severn, the Navy offered more gold braid and brass bands, more beauties and a lacrosse game with a national championship at stake.

When Navy held its pep rally on Thursday evening, two days before the game, it had no inkling that the Army lacrosse team was nursing a year-long grudge. The likelihood of athletic successes was adding to the normal joys of the Annapolis June Week. An electric “Beat Army!” sign flashed from Bancroft Hall, the world’s biggest dormitory, which houses all 3,665 of the midshipmen.

Rear Admiral John F. Davidson, the academy superintendent, was introduced at the rally by a glib midshipman as “Big Daddy,” and he took it gamely while the exuberant middies cheered. Already the first dates were arriving for their week-long stay, a social assembly that would include three dances, three parades, a concert by Duke Ellington and an address by President Kennedy at graduation. Tough old Navy captains with houses on the academy grounds were helplessly watching their wives take in girl boarders by the score, while the graceful but small colonial town of Annapolis (23,385) was preparing its boarding houses for 50,000 visitors. (Also ready: the town’s 200 legal Slot machines, the biggest concentration of one-armed bandits east of Las Vegas.)

The town’s narrow streets, meanwhile, looked like a scene from a Monte Carlo road rally. Four hundred graduating first classmen had bought cars. On May 27 regulations preventing them from using automobiles had been lifted, and convertible sport models in flaming red were obviously this year’s choice.

“I know we’ll do well,” summed up the admiral as he spoke at the Thursday pep rally. “Army, Army, call the doctor,” sang the midshipmen while they waved their bright white hats and stood impressively tall in the short-sleeved, tropical uniforms that Navy wears in such hot spots as Guam, Panama and Annapolis.

The next morning the Navy lacrosse team was practicing on an athletic field so close to the Severn River (which is actually a tidal backwater, not a river at all) that when Coach Bill Bilderback arrived his first words were, “Don’t throw the balls in the water.”

The Navy squad should be able to throw well enough to miss a river. Last year it was unbeaten in college play, ending the season by defeating a favored Army team at West Point. (That was the game which Army was remembering so well this week.) This season Navy won nine more consecutive college games, but frequently in such hairbreadth fashion that John Paul Jones would have given up the ship as lost. Navy was badly behind against every major opponent. It trailed Maryland 5-1 in the second half and fought back to win in overtime. It was behind 8-4 to Baltimore University in the last period, and scored in the last minute to beat Virginia.

Speed and stamina, not lacrosse finesse, seemed to be winning for Navy. At the beginning of the season the Middies were actually given little chance of another title. “But we kept improving every game,” said Coach Bilderback, sounding a little surprised himself. Navy was getting excellent play from a big (6 feet 2 inches) attack man, Tom Mitchell, had an outstanding defenseman in Team Captain Neil Reich and six football players who provided some brute force. The most noticeable of these was John Hewitt, captain of next year’s football team. Navy’s 1961 lacrosse philosophy was simple: run, run, run, and eventually the other fellow won’t be able to get up and down the 110-yard field. This worked all year.

But if Navy was a surprise, Army was more so. In the state of Maryland there is a tendency to feel that a man cannot play lacrosse unless he is raised within 40 miles of Baltimore. Army was pooh-poohed for playing a weak schedule, and accused of using more muscle than talent. “Animals,” a Baltimore newspaper said of the Army team, after carefully making an exception of the Marylanders on it.

One little non-Marylander, however, was a 5-foot 8-inch, 154-pound twirling nuisance named Pat Hillier, who was from Long Island. His 20 goals led Army’s scorers. “Best we’ve seen,” said the Navy scouting report bluntly, after listing six things he did well. Another was 155-pound Rusty Broshous, from the town of West Point, N.Y.

In the midfield Army had Ron Hannon, a 1961 version of Pete Dawkins. Hannon was first captain of cadets, star of the basketball team and, as Navy put it, “a rough, tough midfielder.” The Army defense was composed of three football players, none of whom had handled a lacrosse stick before their second year at West Point. “Our stick work isn’t the best, but we hit people,” said one of them, Glenn Adams, a big, fast football halfback with a knack for understatement.

Army Coach Jim Adams — tall as a Texan, laconic as a down-Easter and actually (of course) from Baltimore — felt that his team, like Navy, also had developed late in the season. And it had two other striking similarities to Navy: a tough defense and the run, run, run philosophy. “We’ll just try and keep up with them,” Coach Adams said. He made it sound wistful. Bilderback was also sounding wistful. Looking at the national lacrosse trophy which Navy has kept since last year’s victory, he said, “I hope I won’t be wrapping it up soon.”

Despite occasional showers, more than 6,000 paid their way into the Navy stadium on Saturday. CBS-TV was also there, taping the game for a sports spectacular to be shown five days later. What they got was a spectacular game. The Navy defense gave Army only 10 shots in the first half (20 is average). But Army, body-checking, battering and, most of all, running, as it substituted four different sets of midfielders, kept its poise. Poor Navy shooting resulted in a 2-2 tie at half time. Then, in the space of 51 frantic seconds shortly after the start of the third period, Navy poured in three goals. Against any less resolute opponent this would have ended the game. At the same time the crowd was cheering the news (announced on loudspeakers) that Navy had won in Army-Navy track, tennis, golf and baseball.

But Army coolly tightened its defense, began putting two men to chasing the Navy player with the ball, and got away with it when “untirable” Navy started slowing down. Army scored while a Navy player was off the field with a penalty, scored again when a midfielder broke through all alone at the goal, and finally tied the game at 5-5 when a beautiful bounce shot by Hannon skidded in.

The blitz continued when a daring pass the full length of the field set up a goal by Broshous. A minute later Broshous brazenly stole the ball from the Navy goalie and flipped it in for a score. In the last moments of the third period Army Captain Sam Wilder almost casually held the ball behind the Navy goal, then came out to his left and scored with exactly one second left. This, the last of six straight Army goals, was doubly discouraging to Navy and proved decisive, because the Middies fought back to 9-8 before finally losing 10-8. So determined was Army’s defense that not a single Navy goal was made by a first-string attack man. Army’s Broshous and Hillier each scored twice.

At the final gun the air was filled with sticks, gloves and helmets thrown high by the Army players. The Army substitutes, who had stood up the entire game as if to show the team’s determination, joined the melee. Happy Jim Adams was carried to the dressing room and congratulated by an Army general wearing a “Beat Navy!” button just below six impressive rows of service decorations on his uniform.

“Your boys wanted it real bad,” said Navy’s beaten Bilderback to Adams. “Lots of guts.” And it must be said that Navy gave nothing away; Army simply took it.

The victory left it up to the Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association to either name Army national champion, or make both Army and Navy co-champions because each lost one game, Army to Virginia. But whatever they do, Army has what every Army team wants most, the win over Navy. Minutes later the Army team was roaring and shouting as its bus crawled through the traffic back to the Navy field house. There it grabbed Jim Adams, starched shirt and all, and threw him over a sea wall into the Severn. As his players were about to let him fly, a frantic Navy voice of authority was heard shouting, “Don’t! Don’t! The tide’s out!” But Navy was just a little too slow again. There was, it turned out, enough water to float Jim Adams, the happiest man at June Week.

Ace Adams

James Adams – Army Lacrosse Coach 1958 – 1969

Continue reading

Joseph Clair Austin

The ties that bind Army Athletes

In 1952, Cadet Joe Austin of the U.S. Military Academy Lacrosse Team used a six foot stick while playing crease attack. Joe made an all-time West Point record of ten goals in one game and had a career total of eighty goals for three years of play which (when the story was told) was still a school record. He was selected 1st team All-American at attack.

In 1962, the then Captain Joe Austin of the United States Air Force, was an assistant coach of the Army Lacrosse Team. Bob Fuellhart ’62, the second Lonely End, (following Bill Carpenter) on the Football Team, was playing on the Army Lacrosse Team as a defense man. Bob became very distressed when his favorite stick was broken in scrimmage. Assistant Coach Joe Austin, who had treasured his six foot high scoring attack stick for ten years generously loaned it to Fuellhart.

The head of the stick was much narrower than we liked for defensive use in those days but Bob felt that it helped his throwing and catching. (Today almost every defense stick has a head of this size which put Bobby much ahead of his time.) Appropriately, Fuellhart became first team All-American at close defense and won the Schmeisser Award as the outstanding defense man of 1962. Bill Carpenter was recipient of the Schmeisser Award in 1960.

This would seem to be quite a rarity for two players Joe and Bob, in two opposite positions, ten years apart, utilizing the same stick to become outstanding players of their times. Both Joe Austin and Bob Fuellhart were killed in the Vietnam War in the mid 1960’s.

Joe Austin, awarded 2 Silver Stars, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Purple Heart was first declared missing 19 March 1969, and confirmed Killed In Action 25 May 79.

Bill Carpenter was nominated for the Medal of Honor received the Distinguished Service Cross.

Bob Fuellhart, awarded a Silver Star, 2 Bronze Stars (V), and Purple Heart, was Killed in Action 12 Aug 65, the day his daughter was born.

A Half Century of Lacrosse by William H. (Dinty) Moore III, the long-time Lacrosse Coach at Navy. It was told to Moore by Army Coach Jim (Ace) Adams. Edited by Butch Darrell Captain 1962 Lacrosse Team

Cadet Days

Joseph Clair Austin

Nickname ?

Class of 1952

Company B-1

Home: 2003 Center St. Moundsville, W. Va.

Born 30 June 1929

Moundsville High School – Graduated 1947

USAF – 19 June 1947 to 19 June 1948

Prep School @ Stewart Field – 3 months Jan 1948

Appointment: State at Large – Senator Kilgore

Date of Entry to Academy?

Date of Graduation ?

Age at Graduation 23

Cullum Number 18680

Cadet Rank & Military Position

  • Captain – Cadet Adjutant of the 1st Regiment

    Height ?

  • Entry
  • Graduation

    Weight ?

  • Entry
  • Playing weight
  • Graduation

    Teams – Lacrosse

    Coaches / Assistant Coaches ?

    Officer Representative

    Lacrosse Team Captain 1952

    Position Played – Crease Attack

    Award of Army A

  • Plebe Year Class Numerals
  • Army A Yearling, Cow, and Firstie Years

    Team Recognition

  • Co- champions with Princeton 1952

    Academy Recognition ?

    Individual Recognition

  • 10 goals against Cornell in 1952, 80 goals 3 years

    Individual Records

  • National
  • Regional
  • League

    Individual Recognition

  • Plebe
  • Yearling
  • Cow Year – Honorable Mention All American
  • Firstie Year – First Team All American

    Post Season Play – 1952 All Star Game North Team

    Injuries

    Significant events, Information, or Write Up about Athlete ?

  • Pointer, Pointer View, New York Times, (Note Home Town Paper was Wheeling News-Register, Wheeling W. Va.)

    Relationship with

  • Tactical Department ?

    Committees and Staff

  • In Support of Corps

    Recreation

  • General Committee, French Club, Camera Club, Ski Club
  • Intramurals

    Class Standing 186 out of ?

    Turn Out Stars ?

    Officer Assignment to the Academy ?

  • Department
  • Coach or Officer Representative

    Military Career

  • Officer Rank – Colonel
  • Advanced Education
  • 1. MS Industrial Administration- Carnegie Tech 1956-1958
  • 2. MS Operations Research – NYU 1962-1962
  • 3. MS Public Administration – George Washington University 1962-1964
  • Listed as Missing in Action 19 March 1967 changed to Killed in Action 25 May 1979
  • Awards – 2 Silver Stars, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Purple Heart

    Family

  • Wife – Beverly Joan Marino Austin
  • Sons Joseph John and Thomas David Austin

    Command of the 34thTactical Fighter Squadron

  • Butch Darrell

    Captain of the 1962 Lacrosse Team

    Charles Cavendish Darrell

    Butch and Ace Adams Army’s Coach in 1962

    Butch was a nice guy — but on the Lacrosse Field he gave no Quarter.

    My father played lacrosse in the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. The Johns Hopkins Team represented the USA against a Canadian Team and won two of three games. Due to the world-wide depression, England and Australia could not make the trip.

    My Father Joseph Cavendish Darrell – 4th from right front row, Fritz Stude is next or 5th from right, while the 6th man is Jack Tumbull. Coach Ray Van Orman is 2d row far right and next to him is Jimmy Benson, a long time John Hopkins trainer. Lacrosse was a Demonstration Olympic Sport in 1928 and 1932, but never became an Olympic Team Sport.

    My father’s name was Joseph Cavendish Darrell and my uncle’s name was Francis Sterett Darrell. Like the rest of us Darrells they got stuck with weird nicknames- my father was “Cabbage” and my uncle was “Mickey.” I have never been able to get much on the 1932 Johns Hopkins Olympic lacrosse team from google, but Johns Hopkins University periodically publishes an article on that event and I have several of them at home.

    The participation medal given to each member of the Lacrosse Demostration Team.

    In 1947, the goalie of that Olympic Team, Mr. Fritz Stude, saw a couple of young hoodlums get into trouble and started a team for kids, so they’d have something better to do than shoot out street lights with BB guns and I joined the team at age 8.

    One of the players, a couple of years older, was Tom Mitchell. He went on to star at Boys Latin, graduating in 1956. In February 1961, I was down at Navy for exchange week-end.

    Late on Saturday afternoon Tom Mitchell, then a Firstie at Navy, barged into my room and said, “Get your stuff Darrell, we’re going to a party with hot women and cold beer!” I don’t remember the hot women, but around 2 AM, Mitchell and I staggered back through Bancroft Hall on our knees.

    “Mitchell,” I said, “I can’t believe they let you get away with this. Where did I go wrong? West Point is nothing but a jail.”

    That spring Tom Mitchell was the Navy star and won the Turnbull Award as the nation’s best attackman.

    Jack Turnbull, one of the all-time great players was later an Air Force Officer killed in Europe during World War II. The award that Tom Mitchell won in 1961 as the nation’s best attackman is named for Jack Turnbull.

    In 2006, my father and my uncle Francis Sterett Darrell were inducted into the Boys Latin Athletic Hall of Fame as part of the first group to enter, so even though they had been a rival to my school, I was invited to the ceremony.

    I noticed that Tom Mitchell was not on the list, so, not having seen or heard of him since 1961, I nominated him and he was inducted last fall (2008).

    He came all the way from Las Vegas and brought several old Navy players and coaches with him to the induction.

    Even though we were fierce rivals in 1961, we were bound together by participation in that game.

    Jimmy Benson, the long time JHU trainer, was still at Hopkins in 1959, and during my summer leave that year graciously helped me rehab the left knee ACL I had torn against Rutgers that spring. Thanks partly to his efforts and to those of the West Point doctors and trainers, I was after a second knee operation Yearling year, able to play my Cow and Firstie years. Lacrosse was the only thing I did even moderatelly well at West Point, so I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to play.

    My brother Kent “Skip” Darrell (ex-64), another one of those goofy nicknames, flunked out of West Point in math at the end of his Plebe year and enrolled at Johns Hopkins. In the 1963 Hopkins-Army game, he scored 4 goals in a 10-9 Hopkins victory. There was an article in the New York Times about it. As a fellow goat, you will be pleased to know that, having flunked out of West Point in Plebe Math, he has been teaching it at St Paul’s School in Baltimore to high schoolers for 37 years! In my humble opinion, he is the best teacher in Maryland.

    I can’t think of anything for my Cullum file. Those familiar with my academic and military reputation at West Point would just laugh at any positive remarks about my Cadet days and shout, “Liar!” (Editors Comment – None of us would ever say anything negative about Butch he was and is a great Classmate. For some of us who were with him in the last sections, his attitude eased the pressure to achieve pro status.)

    The 1961 Army-Navy Lacrosse game was certainly the highlight of my athletic career, however, so I would appreciate it if you’d add the picture of Coach Adams being thrown into the Severn along with my remarks about it to my “page”.

    Coach Ace Adams being chunked into the Severn River after the 1961 Army-Navy Lacrosse game, won by Army 10-8.

    This game, played in the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, was the first lacrosse game ever to be televised nationally. “Ron Hannon” ’61 seemed to come up with every ground ball and Dick Buckner ’61 hit a Navy defenseman so hard I felt the ground shake.

    One of the best lacrosse pictures I’ve ever seen is in our yearbook of “Mac Howard” taking a shot in that game. Rusty Broshous scored two goals when we needed them most. Our victory enabled Army to share the National Championship with Navy- we had dropped a game to Virginia earlier.

    As you can guess, we were jubilant. As soon as coach hit the water, we all jumped in after him still in uniform. “Holy Cow (or perhaps words a little stronger)! The tide’s out!” shouted Dave Harkins. We were facing a six foot high sea-wall. Fortunately, our ever-faithful bus driver Jake knew what to do. He retrieved a rope and life-saving ring from Halsey Field House and fished us out one by one.

    Al Biddison

    Class of 62 – 3 Army A’s in Lacrosse

    Rusty Broshous

    Rusty earned 5 Army A’s in Hockey and Lacrosse.

    Paul Dobbins

    Paul was Captain of the 1962 Hockey Team. He earned 3 Army A’s in Hockey. He also played Lacrosse and Golf.

    Lacrosse

    We lost Bobby Fuellhart in Vietnam.

    Team Captain – Butch Darrell

    Butch and Ace Adams Army’s Coach in 1962

    James Ace Adams – Army Lacrosse Coach 1958 – 1969 – – Lacrosse Hall of Fame http://www.uslacrosse.org/museum/halloffame/view_profile.php?prof_id=10

    Butch was a nice guy — but on the Lacrosse Field he gave no Quarter.

    Coach Ace Adams being chunked into the Severn River after the 1961 Army-Navy Lacrosse game, won by Army 10-8.

    This game, played in the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, was the first lacrosse game ever to be televised nationally. Ron Hannon ’61 seemed to come up with every ground ball and Dick Buckner ’61 hit a Navy defenseman so hard I felt the ground shake.

    One of the best lacrosse pictures I’ve ever seen is in our 62 Howitzer of Mac Howard taking a shot in that game. Rusty Broshous scored two goals when we needed them most. Our victory enabled Army to share the National Championship with Navy- we had dropped a game to Virginia earlier.

    As you can guess, we were jubilant. As soon as coach hit the water, we all jumped in after him still in uniform. “Holy Cow (or perhaps words a little stronger)! The tide’s out!” shouted Dave Harkins. We were facing a six foot high sea-wall. Fortunately, our ever-faithful bus driver Jake knew what to do. He retrieved a rope and life-saving ring from Halsey Field House and fished us out one by one. by Butch Darrell – 1962 Lacrosse Captain

    See below link for details of that day

    http://forwhattheygaveonsaturdayafternoon.com/wp-1961/lacrosse-team

    Rusty Broshous & Dave Harkins

    Al Biddison

    Bobby Fuellhart

    Joe Caldwell

    Continue reading

    Morris Touchstone

    Army Lacrosse Coach

    Awaiting data

    Tom Culver

    Renaissance Man

    Tom Culver led the team in receptions in 1961 year with 20 catches for 305 yards, 15.3 yards per catch. (And we thought Tom spent his time in the dog house, at least some of us less-informed types did.) These ratings seem to be based on yards per catch. His 55-yard reception from Dick Eckert against Navy helped.

    Tom briefly (a couple of years) held the single-game reception record, catching 11 passes in the Michigan game in 1960. A vast coaching/media conspiracy robbed him of this legacy as his number of catches were continually reduced (why, we do not know) until he dropped out of the top few, making way for more well-known and loved receivers.

    He played on the basketball team but was dropped for a poor performance in a game in which he did not play.

    Tom also earned a letter in lacrosse, scoring several goals against Mt. Washington and Navy.

    Many know him for his musical group, the Hot Nuts, that played classical pieces in the Weapons Room while officers were present then went into rock and roll when they departed.

    Bird watcher, author, golfer, raconteur: truly a renaissance man.

    Charles Flint

    awaiting data

    Vin Murphy

    Vincent Edward Murphy

    Class 1962

    Company L-1

    Home Town Winchester, Ma.

    High School Winchester High

    • Attended with Joe Belinno, Navy’s Great Back
    • Designated the most underrated Football player in the state

    Prep School Columbia Prep – Wash D.C.

    • Sent by Navy as was Joe Belinno the previous year
    • Missed the Navy cutoff score in English by 5 points
    • Recruited by Army which had a lower English score requirement than Navy but a 20 higher Math Score -(see Turnout Stars)

    Date of Entry to Academy 1 July 1958

    Date of Graduation 6 June 1962

    Age at Graduation 23

    Cullum Number 24400

    Cadet Rank Sgt

    Height

    • Entry 5′ 10″
    • Graduation 5′ 10″

    Weight

    • Entry 185
    • Playing weight 170
    • Graduation 185

    Teams

    • Plebe Football
    • Plebe Lacrosse

    Coaches

    • Col Blaik Head Coach Football
    • It was either Academics or Football

    Position Played End in Football

    No significant amount of Demerits

    3 Turnout Stars Earned- Math, Thermodynamics, the 3d is for some reason locked out of his mind.

    Bob Fuellhart

    80 – End — Fall of 59

    Bobby became first team All-American at close defense and won the Schmeisser Award as the outstanding defense man of 1962.

    Former Classic Stars in Action

    The list of ex-Army Players grows: Pete-Dawkins To Blanda, Bill Carpenter, Dick Eckert, Glenn Blumhard, Monk Hilliard, all in Viet Nam And there was Bob Fuellhart. Maybe not all the buffs among the 102,000 will remember the name quickly, although he came three times to Broad St. pageant. He was a lean-jawed, solid kid who grew up at Tionesta, a village in the bear and deer country of Western Pennsylvania. He had been a hurdler and broad jumper at Kiski Prep before going to West Point.

    Because of his fine speed, Fuellhart played the “Lonesome End” behind Bill Carpenter his first season at Army, It was ironic. Carpenter an advisor in Viet Nam for 13 months when few people could even find the Mekong Delta on a map, was wounded twice. He is now an instructor at Fort Knox, KY. and wears the Bronze and Silver star.

    Fuellhart’s trips to Philadelphia were not cheerful ones. His teams lost three times to Navy. The last one was in 1961, a day memorable because Of John Kennedy’s halftime promenade across a blustery, cold field without a topcoat. Navy took that one, 13-7, although cramped by injuries, was a rangy, bitter figure on defense.

    That’s how they later remembered him in Viet Nam. His Vietnamese troops called Fuellhart “The Long One,” and not only because his six-foot height towered over the 100-Pound natives. With a long cigar and the red beret of the 44th Ranger Battalion, Fuellhart was not hard to spot and he astonished the Vietnamese by standing up in battle to direct air strikes.

    Large Target, Big Courage

    He did it at least twice. Once he climbed out of a water-filled ditch to Point out Viet Cong targets for striking fighters. He was a large target, and Viet Cong fire shattered a banana tree over him showering leaves and debris. “It took a lot of courage ” ,said an American captain who recommended the Bronze Star, “especially for an officer in his first combat.”

    On Aug. 12 Fuellhart’s jungle fighting unit ran into strong Viet Cong fire near a hamlet of thatched shacks called Phung Heip. The Viet Cong had armored carriers and an American machine gun, and it was taking a toll.

    “Not as much fire at my end,” Fuellhart radioed to Capt. Jerry Devlin. “Maybe we can move in.” “Wait for another air strike”, said Devlin. Fuellhart, standing up in the mud with the radio strapped to his back, was talking to the helicopters as they hit the tree line. He went to his knees, struck by a bullet. He died a n hour before his wife, Jan, home in Tionesta, gave birth to a girl. Rabble – 1965 By Tom Sargeant, Staff Writer

    The ties that bind Army Athletes

    In 1952, Cadet Joe Austin of the U.S. Military Academy Lacrosse Team used a six foot stick while playing crease attack. Joe made an all-time West Point record of ten goals in one game and had a career total of eighty goals for three years of play which (when the story was told) was still a school record. He was selected 1st team All-American at attack.

    In 1962, the then Captain Joe Austin of the United States Air Force, was an assistant coach of the Army Lacrosse Team. Bob Fuellhart ’62, the second Lonely End, (following Bill Carpenter) on the Football Team, was playing on the Army Lacrosse Team as a defense man. Bob became very distressed when his favorite stick was broken in scrimmage. Assistant Coach Joe Austin, who had treasured his six foot high scoring attack stick for ten years generously loaned it to Fuellhart.

    The head of the stick was much narrower than we liked for defensive use in those days but Bob felt that it helped his throwing and catching. (Today almost every defense stick has a head of this size which put Bobby much ahead of his time.) Appropriately, Fuellhart became first team All-American at close defense and won the Schmeisser Award as the outstanding defense man of 1962. Bill Carpenter was recipient of the Schmeisser Award in 1960.

    This would seem to be quite a rarity for two players Joe and Bob, in two opposite positions, ten years apart, utilizing the same stick to become outstanding players of their times. Both Joe Austin and Bob Fuellhart were killed in the Vietnam War in the mid 1960’s.

    Joe Austin, awarded 2 Silver Stars, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Purple Heart was first declared missing 19 March 1969, and confirmed Killed In Action 25 May 79.

    Bill Carpenter was nominated for the Medal of Honor received the Distinguished Service Cross.

    Bob Fuellhart, awarded a Silver Star, 2 Bronze Stars (V), and Purple Heart, was Killed in Action 12 Aug 65, the day his daughter was born.

    A Half Century of Lacrosse by William H. (Dinty) Moore III, the long-time Lacrosse Coach at Navy. It was told to Moore by Army Coach Jim (Ace) Adams. Edited by Butch Darrell Captain 1962 Lacrosse Team

    Pa. Team Members 1959